Wichita Business Journal Data Walk: Posters

18 Min Read

Nov 08, 2023

Text from each Wichita Business Journal Data Walk poster and the one-pager is below. Select a link to go directly to each item.

Business

What This Measures

Business owners of employer firms’ reported expectations for continued business operations into 2023 by race and ethnicity in the United States.

Uncertain Future

In 2022, about half of all business owners across all racial and ethnic groups reported that they anticipated continuing operations at or above their current level. However, business owners of color reported more uncertainty for their firms’ continued operation.

Stacked Bar Chart: Expectation for Continued Business Operations into 2023 by Business Owner Race and Ethnicity in the United States, 2022

Yes, at or above the current level of operations (Employer Firms %)

  • White: 55.1%
  • Hispanic: 51.6%
  • American Indian and Alaska Native: 48.2%
  • Black or African American: 48.5%
  • Asian: 44.5%
  • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 49.9%

Yes, at or below the current level of operations (Employer Firms %)

  • White: 27.7%
  • Hispanic: 30.0%
  • American Indian and Alaska Native: 30.4%
  • Black or African American: 29.9%
  • Asian: 31.5%
  • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 21.4%

No (Employer Firms %)

  • White: 4.5%
  • Hispanic: 3.2%
  • American Indian and Alaska Native: 4.8%
  • Black or African American: 4.0%
  • Asian: 4.6%
  • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 4.7%

Don’t Know (Employer Firms %)

  • White: 12.8%
  • Hispanic: 15.2%
  • American Indian and Alaska Native: 16.6%
  • Black or African American: 17.7%
  • Asian: 19.3%
  • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 24.0%

Note: Survey of business ownership (51 percent or more of the stock or equity in the business) and categorized by firms. Firms with no majority owner were asked to report demographics for up to 4 persons owning the largest percentages of the business (minimum of 10 percent ownership). Firms were only counted once per totals in each racial group but could be included in more than one group if sole, majority (51 percent), or majority combination of owners reported to be of multiple races.

Source: Preliminary Data from U.S. Census Bureau and National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, 2022 Annual Business Survey.

Why This is Important

Business ownership has been an important tool for generational wealth development in the United States. In 2019, equity from business ownership formed 34 percent of household nonfinancial assets, second only to home ownership (45 percent). However, inequitable historical policies such as redlining, restrictive covenants and exclusionary zoning policies barred communities of color from building wealth in these ways. Today, although businesses owned by people of color are growing, the lasting impact of these policies can create additional challenges for entrepreneurs of color who are seeking small business loans because of the common requirement to be able to personally guarantee the loan. During the COVID-19 pandemic, business owners of color also experienced greater earning losses than White business owners.

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Small Business Administration, Urban Institute, Kansas Department of Commerce.

An Initiative of

Wichita Business Journal: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Summit

Funding and Support Provided by

Kansas Health Foundation
Kansas Leadership Center

Analysis and Design by

Kansas Health Institute

Child Care

What This Measures

Child care cost burden by household and the number of child care slots available for each child.

Child Care Access

There are up to 10 children under age 3 per one child care opening in Sedgwick County.

Source: Child Care Aware of Kansas, 2023 Child Care Supply Demand Report.

18.5%

Family households with one child under age 3, spent $11,186 on average each year on child care, which is nearly one-fifth (18.5 percent) of the median income ($60,593) across households in Sedgwick County.

Source: Child Care Aware of Kansas, Sedgwick County Point-In-Time Child Care Data, Generated on Sept. 24, 2023, and U.S. Census Bureau, 2021 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table DP03.

59.4%

16,589 (59.4 percent) children under age 6 with working parents in Sedgwick County are without child care options.

Source: Child Care Aware of Kansas, Sedgwick County Point-In-Time Child Care Data, Generated on Sept. 24, 2023.

Why This is Important

Child care is a major household expense for families with young children. Access to affordable and high-quality child care is essential for parents to be able to provide sufficient income for their family while ensuring their children’s social and educational needs are met. Affordable child care in a community also strengthens the economy with a larger labor force and stronger tax base. Healthy People 2030 has identified child care as a high-priority public health issue and is developing a specific target.

Source: Kansas Health Matters.

An Initiative of

Wichita Business Journal: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Summit

Funding and Support Provided by

Kansas Health Foundation
Kansas Leadership Center

Analysis and Design by

Kansas Health Institute

Demographics

What This Measures

Percent of people in city of Wichita by race and ethnicity.

Spotlight on Diversity

Two in 10 people in city of Wichita are Hispanic or Latino. One in 10 people in city of Wichita is Black or African American.

Pie Chart: Race and Ethnicity in City of Wichita, 2020

  • Two or More Races, Not Hispanic: 5.9%
  • Other Race, Not Hispanic: 0.4%
  • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, Not Hispanic: 0.1%
  • American Indian and Alaska Native, Not Hispanic: 0.9%
  • Asian, Not Hispanic: 5.0%
  • Black or African American, Not Hispanic: 10.6%
  • White, Not Hispanic: 58.8%
  • Hispanic or Latino, Any Races: 18.3%

Note: Total number of people in city of Wichita = 397,532.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2020 U.S. Decennial Census Table P9.

Why This is Important

The population of Sedgwick County is changing. Growing diversity has important implications for the health of communities as they consider how they will function and provide essential services for their residents.

Source: Kansas Health Foundation, Kansas Health Institute.

An Initiative of

Wichita Business Journal: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Summit

Funding and Support Provided by

Kansas Health Foundation
Kansas Leadership Center

Analysis and Design by

Kansas Health Institute

Education

What This Measures

Graduation rate of Wichita Unified School District (USD 259) students by race, ethnicity and sex.

Graduation Gap

Overall, about 4 in 5 Wichita Unified School District (USD 259) students graduated during the 2021-2022 school year. However, graduation rates were lower for Black male students.

Bar Chart: Graduation Rate in Wichita Unified School District (USD 259) by Race, Ethnicity and Sex, 2021-2022 School Year

Healthy People 2030 Goal: 90.7%

Hispanic

  • Female: 87.5%
  • Male: 77.9%

White

  • Female: 82.8%
  • Male: 75.7%

Black

  • Female: 81.5%
  • Male: 67.7%

Overall

  • Female: 84.8%
  • Male: 76.2%

Note: Overall graduation rate (all students) for Wichita Unified School District = 80.4 percent. Overall graduation rates include Hispanic, White, Black, American Indian or Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander, Asian, and multi-racial students. This data is from a four-year cohort study. The cohort study follows students from 9th grade – 12th grade to calculate graduation rate. Students who transferred in or out, immigrated or died have been accounted for in each four-year cohort.

Source: Kansas State Department of Education, 2021-2022 Graduation Rates – Four Year Adjusted Cohort Formula.

Why This is Important

There’s a strong connection between education and health — for example, higher levels of education are linked to increased economic stability and a lower risk of death later in life. The Healthy People 2030 national health target is to increase the proportion of high school students who graduate in four years to 90.7 percent.

Source: Healthy People 2030.

An Initiative of

Wichita Business Journal: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Summit

Funding and Support Provided by

Kansas Health Foundation
Kansas Leadership Center

Analysis and Design by

Kansas Health Institute

Housing

What This Measures

The percent of owner-occupied housing units and the percent of renter-occupied housing units in each race and ethnicity group.

Homeowners and Renters

Among all race and ethnicity groups in city of Wichita, Black or African American households rent at the highest rate (61.8%).

Stacked Bar Chart: Housing Occupancy by Race and Ethnicity in City of Wichita, 2022

Asian (Households %)

  • Owner-Occupied: 67.4%
  • Renter-Occupied: 32.6%

White (Households %)

  • Owner-Occupied: 66.2%
  • Renter-Occupied: 33.8%

Hispanic or Latino Origin (Households %)

  • Owner-Occupied: 64.5%
  • Renter-Occupied: 35.5%

American Indian and Alaska Native (Households %)

  • Owner-Occupied: 61.7%
  • Renter-Occupied: 38.3%

Some Other Race (Households %)

  • Owner-Occupied: 59.1%
  • Renter-Occupied: 40.9%

Two or More Races (Households %)

  • Owner-Occupied: 43.7%
  • Renter-Occupied: 56.3%

Black or African American (Households %)

  • Owner-Occupied: 38.2%
  • Renter-Occupied: 61.8%

Note: Race and ethnicity of households are determined by the self-reported demographic information of the householder who responded to 2022 American Community Survey. Number of White householders = 114,839. Number of Asian householders = 6,658. Number of Hispanic or Latino origin householders = 18,154. Number of American Indian and Alaska Native householders = 1,198. Number of some other race householders = 6,030. Number of two or more races householders = 13,656. Number of Black or African American householders = 14,718.

Source: Kansas Health Institute analysis of U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey 2022 1-Year Estimates, Table S2502.

Why This is Important

Homeownership is associated with better health, fewer illnesses and lower rates of depression and anxiety. Equity in a home can be used to build savings and generational wealth and to secure loans to start a business. However, lasting impacts of slavery, segregation and policies such as redlining have created inequitable opportunities for homeownership, particularly for Black community members.

Source: County Health Rankings, Brookings Institution.

An Initiative of

Wichita Business Journal: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Summit

Funding and Support Provided by

Kansas Health Foundation
Kansas Leadership Center

Analysis and Design by

Kansas Health Institute

Industry

What This Measures

Number of employees by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Industries in the Wichita Metro Area. NAICS is the standard used by federal statistical agencies to classify business establishments.

Wichita’s Workforce

Manufacturing employs the most people in the Wichita Metro Area (51,352), more than half of whom (55.0 percent) work in transportation equipment manufacturing (aircraft engine and parts manufacturing).

Bar Chart: Employees by Industry in the Wichita Metro Area, 2020

(NAICS Industries: Number of Employees)

  • Manufacturing: 51,352
  • Health Care and Social Assistance: 41,794
  • Retail Trade: 33,101
  • Accommodation and Food Services: 28,035
  • Construction: 16,644
  • Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services: 14,792
  • Professional, Scientific and Technical Services: 12,712
  • Other Services (Except Public Administration): 11,048
  • Wholesale Trade: 10,711
  • Transportation and Warehousing: 10,189
  • Finance and Insurance: 8,146
  • Management of Companies and Enterprises: 7,857
  • Educational Services: 5,166
  • Arts, Entertainment and Recreation: 4,655
  • Information: 4,436
  • Real Estate and Rental and Leasing: 3,724
  • Other: 1,874

Manufacturing: 55.0 percent (28,255) of manufacturing employees in Wichita Metro Area work in Transportation Equipment Manufacturing. Other top manufacturing sub-sectors were Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing (10.8 percent) and Machinery Manufacturing (9.3 percent).

Health Care and Social Assistance: 40.6 percent (16,974) of Health Care and Social Assistance employees work in Ambulatory Health Care Services. Other top sub-sectors were Hospitals (22.4 percent) and Nursing and Residential Care Facilities (21.8 percent).

Note: Industry classification is based on 2017 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes. The NAICS codes for Manufacturing includes Transportation Equipment Manufacturing including aircraft manufacturing, aircraft engine and engine parts manufacturing, and other aircraft parts and auxiliary equipment manufacturing. Transportation and warehousing also include air transportation.

Source: 2020 County Business Patterns, Statistics of U.S. Businesses (SUSB).

Why This is Important

Local employers serve a vital role in the health of communities. People who work are more likely to have positive health outcomes, particularly when employed by businesses that prioritize the health and safety of their employees. Poor community health can increase health care costs, increase sick days, lower productivity and competitiveness and compromise business success and growth. The demographics of the workforce are also shifting. As industries become more diverse, employers are tasked with ensuring equitable distribution of work-related benefits and risks across employees and examining existing policies and practice for potential bias.

Source: Healthy People 2030, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

An Initiative of

Wichita Business Journal: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Summit

Funding and Support Provided by

Kansas Health Foundation
Kansas Leadership Center

Analysis and Design by

Kansas Health Institute

Neighborhoods

What This Measures

The Area Deprivation Index calculates comparative levels of deprivation (compared to nation or state) based on factors of income, education, employment and housing quality.

Concentrated Disadvantage

Many of the city of Wichita neighborhoods are ranked among the most disadvantaged of all neighborhoods in the United States. This is contrasted by lower levels of disadvantage in eastern city of Wichita neighborhoods north of Kellogg.

Map: 2021 Area Deprivation Index of Wichita Metro Area

Description: A map of Wichita, Kansas by neighborhood, defined as census block groups. Each block group is given a percentage rank between 1 for least disadvantaged block group and 100 for most disadvantaged block group nationally. Many of the city of Wichita neighborhoods are ranked among the most disadvantaged of all neighborhoods in the United States. In Wichita neighborhoods south of Kellogg, neighborhoods range between 75 percentile rank and 100 percentile rank nationally. North of Kellogg and west of Interstate 135, neighborhoods are in the 64-97 percentile rank. In North Central Wichita, neighborhoods are ranked most disadvantaged in the United States (96-100 percentile rank). This is contrasted by lower levels of disadvantage in eastern city of Wichita neighborhoods north of Kellogg (11-75 percentile rank).

Note: “Neighborhood” is defined as census block group. Higher percentiles represent greater levels of disadvantage in a census block group. A percentile rank of 1 signifies the least disadvantaged census block groups nationally. A percentile rank of 100 signifies the most disadvantaged census block group nationally. 2021 ADI constructed using American Community Survey 2017-2021 5-year estimates. ADI is reported as a percentile rank (even groups of 100) when compared nationally or a decile rank (even groups of 10) when compared to the state.

Source: University of Wisconsin Madison Applied Population Lab Neighborhood Atlas, 2021.

Why This is Important

The neighborhood you live in has impacts on your health outcomes, including rates of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and death. Understanding where disadvantage is concentrated in communities can help decision-makers develop solutions with the community members with the greatest need.

Source: University of Wisconsin’s Neighborhood Atlas.

An Initiative of

Wichita Business Journal: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Summit

Funding and Support Provided by

Kansas Health Foundation
Kansas Leadership Center

Analysis and Design by

Kansas Health Institute

Redlining

What This Measures

1937 neighborhood redlining designations in city of Wichita.

Discrimination

In 1937, 64 percent of neighborhoods in the city of Wichita were barred access to mortgage financing because of discriminatory redlining practices against people who were Black, were immigrants or had low income.

Map: Legacy of Discrimination: 1937 Neighborhood Redlining Designations Overlay Present-Day Map of Wichita

A 1937 map of Wichita, Kansas, from the Department of Home Owner’s Loan Corporation in which they graded Wichita neighborhoods A for “Best” in green, B for “Still Desirable” in blue, C for “Definitely Declining” in yellow and D for “Hazardous” in red. The map is overlaid on a map of present-day Wichita to show specific crossroads and regions. In Wichita, 15 percent were labeled A for “Best” mainly in eastern Wichita north of Kellogg, 8 percent were labeled B for “Still Desirable” in north central and northwest Wichita, 13 percent were labeled C for “Definitely Declining” in central and west Wichita and 64 percent were labeled D or “Hazardous” west of S. Hillside St in both north, south and central Wichita.

Pie Chart

  • A “Best”: 15%
  • B “Still Desirable”: 8%
  • C “Definitely Declining”: 13%
  • D “Hazardous”: 64%

Demographics (1940)

  • Total population: 114,966
  • Native-born white: 93.1%
  • African-American: 4.9%
  • Foreign-born white: 1.9%

Note: This map and classifications were prepared by the Division of Research and Statistics and the Appraisal Department of Home Owner’s Loan Corporation in 1937.

Source: Home Owner’s Loan Corporation, 1937, accessed through University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab, Mapping Inequality.

Why This is Important

The information on this poster reflects 1937 classifications of the city of Wichita by the federal agents of the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC). HOLC agents gave neighborhoods a grade A “Best” in green to D “Hazardous” in red. These HOLC designations are where the term “redlining” comes from. Following now-outlawed guidelines for early 20th century real estate appraisal standards, HOLC agents were instructed to ask if there was “Any threat of infiltration of foreign-born, negro or lower grade population?” when assessing a neighborhood’s mortgage security. If the agents “perceived an infiltration” of people who were Black, were immigrants or had low income, these neighborhoods were designated in red as “Hazardous” (grade D). These classifications systematically institutionalized discrimination, denying those living in these neighborhoods access to capital investment for housing and economic opportunity. Although redlining was banned nationally in 1968, these policies had lasting impacts on opportunities for homeownership rates and generational wealth for Black community members.

Source: Mapping Inequality, Urban Institute.

An Initiative of

Wichita Business Journal: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Summit

Funding and Support Provided by

Kansas Health Foundation
Kansas Leadership Center

Analysis and Design by

Kansas Health Institute

 

One-Pager — Data Walk: Wichita Business Journal

Discussion Questions

  • What surprises you?
  • What else do you want to learn?

Education

Overall, about 4 in 5 Wichita United School District (USD 259) students graduated during the 2021-2022 school year. However, graduation rates were lower for Black male students.

Child Care

  • There are up to 10 children under age 3 per one child care opening in Sedgwick County.
  • Family households with one child under age 3 spent $11,186 on average each year on child care, which is nearly one-fifth (18.5 percent) of
    the median income ($60,593) across households in Sedgwick County.
  • 16,589 (59.4 percent) children under age 6 with working parents in Sedgwick County are without child care options.

Neighborhoods

Many of the city of Wichita neighborhoods are ranked among the most disadvantaged of all neighborhoods in the United States. This is contrasted by lower levels of disadvantage in eastern city of Wichita neighborhoods north of Kellogg.

Demographics

  • Two in 10 people in city of Wichita are Hispanic or Latino.
  • One in 10 people in city of Wichita is Black or African American.

Industry

Manufacturing employs the most people in the Wichita Metro Area (51,352), more than half of whom (55.0 percent) work in transportation equipment manufacturing (aircraft engine and parts manufacturing).

Business

In 2022, about half of all business owners across all racial and ethnic groups reported that they anticipated continuing operations at or above their current level. However, business owners of color reported more uncertainty for their firms’ continued operation.

Housing

Among all race and ethnicity groups in the city of Wichita, Black or African American households rent at the highest rate (61.8 percent).

Post-Event Evaluation Survey

Thank you for attending the Wichita Business Journal Data Walk!

We value your feedback. Please let us know how we did.

To take a brief (2-3 minute) survey, please visit bit.ly/WichitaEvaluationSurvey

An Initiative of

Wichita Business Journal: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Summit

Funding and Support Provided by

Kansas Health Foundation
Kansas Leadership Center

Analysis and Design by

Kansas Health Institute

About Kansas Health Institute

The Kansas Health Institute supports effective policymaking through nonpartisan research, education and engagement. KHI believes evidence-based information, objective analysis and civil dialogue enable policy leaders to be champions for a healthier Kansas. Established in 1995 with a multiyear grant from the Kansas Health Foundation, KHI is a nonprofit, nonpartisan educational organization based in Topeka.

Learn More About KHI