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COVID-19 Vaccine Intent Among Kansas Adults — Pulse on Kansas, Issue 7 (June 18, 2021)

By Emily Burgen, M.P.H., Cheng-You Tsai, M.P.H., Wen-Chieh Lin, Ph.D. | June 18, 2021

COVID-19 Vaccine Intent Among Kansas Adults — Pulse on Kansas, Issue 7 (June 18, 2021)

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In April, while more Kansans reported being vaccinated for COVID-19 and fewer Kansans reported being undecided, the percentage of Kansans who said they definitely would not get a vaccine remained steady. This fact sheet analyzes data from the U.S. Census Bureau's Household Pulse Survey for April 14 to 26 and focuses on understanding the reasons why some Kansas adults “would definitely not get a vaccine” or remained “undecided,” including those who “would probably” or “would probably not” get a vaccine and those who responded by selecting a new "unsure" category on the survey.

The Pulse on Kansas series reports data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey on important impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in Kansas. Sign up here to receive the latest issue and more by email or follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

 

Key Points include:

  • In April, fewer Kansans than ever had not made a decision about getting a COVID-19 vaccine. The percentage of Kansas adults who were “undecided” decreased by more than half between January (38.2 percent) and the end of April (14.6 percent).
  • The percentage of Kansans who reported they “would definitely not get a vaccine” has remained consistent, at fewer than one in 10 Kansas adults (7.9 to 8.3 percent) since January 2021.
  • The leading reasons for Kansas adults who were “undecided” about getting a vaccine included concern about possible side effects (66.0 percent), planning to wait and see if it is safe (60.2 percent) and a belief that other people need it more right now (46.9 percent).
  • Other than concern about possible side effects (61.6 percent), Kansas adults who would “definitely not get a vaccine” cited a different set of reasons, including not trusting the government (42.3 percent) and not trusting COVID-19 vaccines (31.9 percent).

The Kansas Health Institute supports effective policymaking through nonpartisan research, education and engagement. KHI believes evidence-based information, objective analysis and civil dialogue enable policy leaders to be champions for a healthier Kansas. Established in 1995 with a multiyear grant from the Kansas Health Foundation, KHI is a nonprofit, nonpartisan educational organization based in Topeka.